“Your Biggest Fans are Your Harshest Critics”

Posted on December 21, 2014 Comments

I now own the iPhone 6 plus. After that long winded rant about how underwhelming iPhone 6/6+ was and that I was going to switch to Android, I come crawling back to Apple.

I’ll start off by humbly admitting that I was wrong. There, I said it. But what was I wrong about? To say that when paying for iPhone, you’re paying more for less and the general bashing of the camera. The iPhone 6 plus, to its credit, has a fantastic processor and the quality of the build is great. I’ve not had any issues with the phone being bent as some have claimed to accomplish in less than 24 hours. I have no idea how people are bending this phone in their pockets… well, I do, but it wouldn’t be very nice if I wrote what I thought here.) The phone, and the software, are superb.

Let’s start with why I decided to get iPhone 6 plus in the end over android: the Google Nexus 6 was a major disappointment in size, and price. Woah, what? Apple is better priced? Hold on, let me explain. Nexus 6 is a beautiful phone in so many ways, but once it came out, the more I looked into it, the less attracted… the Nexus 6 is just too big in width and height. 5.5 inches is pushing it as it is. Phones should not be any bigger than that. The Nexus, at 6.27 inches, is monster sized phablet style. It’s fatter and bulkier around the body compared to the slim iPhone as well. As someone who keeps a phone in a hard case its entire life which then adds to the bulk, this wasn’t going to work for me. This may seem like a petty reason not to buy a smartphone but, it matters. I do not know why Google went so large with the Nexus 6 without really much thought to accessibility, but it killed it for me.

Now a word about pricing. Google Nexus 6 is no “deal” on price point compared to iPhone 6 plus either. What the hell happened to Android phones being “cheaper” than apple? Unlike their predecessors, Google’s latest Nexus 6 device is anything BUT cheap.  Nexus 6 is an $850-$1000 phone. iPhone 6 plus runs about $900 new w/ sales tax, but I paid around $700 for the 64gb verison buying it used. Since I was going to be buying a phone off contract, there was no “deal” anymore to be had by switching to Android.

Yes, there are other Android phones like Moto X 2014, and Droid Maxx. The Droid Maxx is a great phone, but it is only for Verizon. I will probably not see it for AT&T. However, they too, are quite a lot of money though off contract as well. I was unimpressed by the camera comparisons and battery life of Moto X despite higher megapixels. If I had to pick an Android phone today (for AT&T), it would definitely be Moto X 2014. But I just didn’t want it, I guess. I had my sights set on the “Google” brand phone because I feel having one from them provides the best longevity… and they are supposed to be setting the standard for the rest of the manufacturers. Google has failed to do that. Instead, it’s a rather unique phone/phablet that I don’t see the others copying.

I heavily criticized the iPhone 6 plus for its lackluster hardware specifications and I stand by some of them. The 8MP camera is still a disappointment to me, as is the fact that it only contains 1GB of RAM. This stuff should have been upgraded, but I can see why they didn’t. I am in the minority because when I get a new device, I keep it for 4-5 years before getting the latest version if I need it. Remember that I come from iPhone 4 – the original, not the 4s. iPhone 6 plus is a major upgrade for me, and with Apple dropping future iOS support for it (along with my home button being broken), it was appropriate to upgrade. In 4 years I don’t know if 1GB of RAM is going to be enough. iOS is excellent at optimizing RAM usage, but you can only go so far. If only it was 2GB, then it would have been more future-proof.  Apple certainly didn’t do anything innovative this time around either and to be honest – I don’t think iOS itself was totally ready for a phone of this size. They were never planning it and lagged behind in this. “Reachablity” feels a little strange, but I’m sure the software will be adapted over time.

I still do not enjoy the whole restrictive cage that iPhone users have to deal with, but as usual, the jailbreak community is strong. First thing I did when I got home after activating it was jailbreak and install all of my favorite apps. I have SSH access, Remote Messages, iTransmission, VLC, and tethering. I’m set. Until the next jailbreak headache comes along, of course. Overall, I feel the iPhone 6 is the best for me, and that Android is a very close second. I should not have been so quick to dismiss the phone entirely and assumed that Nexus 6 was going to be Android’s knight in shining armor. I guess deep down I’m really just a big fan of iOS + iPhone after all.

As a side note, I’m enjoying my Reachability Nyan Cat which I obtained by jailbreaking:

Reach The Nyan Cat

 

Comments

  1. Oooooo you got a new shiny! I got the iPhone 6 64GB version in gold myself. I prefer it because I can still do most things one handed no problem. It really is a solid phone. I hear what you say about future proofing the phone, but we both know that it isn’t in Apple’s best interest for you to not upgrade for four years. It is simply designed to wear out after a certain amount of time as with any product made since the new millennium. Anyway I am glad you saw the error of your ways :)

    • I’m waiting for the same thing that happened to the PC market to hit smartphones. Apple is delaying things when they could easily equip their phone with 3GB of RAM or more but they can only fight Moore’s Law for so long.

      What’s going to happen when smartphones that have 4GB and 8GB of RAM become available? This has been good enough for me for a long time now and I don’t see that changing; and I consider myself a power user.

      Just like the desktop and even laptop “upgrader” market slowed down, once hardware advances far enough I suspect the same thing will happen to smartphones. Especially now that carriers aren’t subsidizing them anymore. Unless of course they are forced into obsolescence through software.

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